Posts containing the tag "cultural democracy".

 

 

 

Access Space online

Owen Kelly talks with Jake Harries, the director of art and innovation at Access Space, in Sheffield, England.

They discuss the ways in which the current lockdown has affected Access Space, as well as a range of issues including the commons, laser printing, open source, and possible futures.

 

 

 

A day on the commons

In the previous two episodes Owen Kelly looked at cultural commons from a geographical and then an historical perspective. He played music and introduced a vintage radio programme.

In this episode he joins Sophie Hope for a detailed examination of the commons, and its possible relationship to ideas of cultural democracy.

They base their discussion on a reading of Guy Standing’s book Plunder of the Commons. They also borrow ideas from David Bollier’s book Think Like a Commoner.

 

 

 

Death House Rescue

In the previous episode Owen Kelly looked at songs available through the Free Music Archive, Jamendo and Tribe of Noise. We traversed the geography of the musical commons. In this episode we dive into the historical cultural commons.

We listen to the very first episode of The Shadow, starring a young Orson Welles, and sponsored by Blue Coal.

Our cultural history is under attack. The Shadow Knows!

 

 

 

Radio Miaaw – the sounds of the commons

In this episode Owen Kelly looks at the range of musics currently available under a creative commons licence.

He looks at some artist-released music as well as songs available through the Free Music Archive, Jamendo and Tribe of Noise. We pass through a varied landscape that includes modern pop, country, Indian jazz, folk and North African music. There is more to this than meets the ear.

You will hear David Rovics, Samie Power, Kat Penkin, Solsar, Jon Worthy & the Bends, Radha Thomas, Shoemansky, Starmob, …mmm and Lessazo. Mmm, indeed!

 

 

 

Guerrilla Translation, DisCos & the marketplace

Stacco Troncoso co-founded Guerrilla Translation with his partner, Ann Marie Utratel, as a living project to ground P2P and Commons theories in real practices.

He talks with Owen Kelly about the work of the group, and the ways in which they see the structure of their group as a vital part of its practice.

 

 

 

Revolutionary teachers and post-capitalism

Sophie Hope recorded this episode in a café in a break from her ongoing picket. She talked with Mike Neary, Emeritus Professor of sociology at the School of Social Sciences at the University of Lincoln, about the current academic strikes across England, the idea behind teach-outs, and the role of education in establishing a post-capitalist society.

 

 

 

Sophie Hope is on strike!

In this episode Sophie Hope explains why the staff at UCL have gone on strike, what they hope to achieve, and the complications of withdrawing your labour when your labour concerns the production of knowledge rather than tangible goods.

 

 

 

Coding tacit knowledge in southern India

Owen Kelly and Irma Sippola have begun two cultural projects in Kerala, south India, in partnership with an NGO called SISP.

In this episode Sophie Hope talks to Owen about the purpose of the projects and the practicality of passing on coding skills to teenagers with no prior experience of using computers.

 

 

 

Time as a Public Good

In this episode Sophie Hope and Owen Kelly continue talking to Russell Southwood about ideas arising from the 1985 book What a Way to Run a Railroad that he co-authored with Charles Landry, Dave Morley and Patrick Wright.

Chapter 7 of the book looks towards the future, and the discussion looks at the cultural, economic and political issues that linger on from the nineteen eighties; sometimes in almost unchanged forms.

 

 

 

Distribution & Evolutionary Markets

On October 28, 2019, Owen Kelly and Sophie Hope attended a seminar in Newcastle in which every participant had to bring a memento from their community art practice. Sophie brought a copy of What a Way to Run a Railroad, a book published by Comedia in 1985.

This sparked a lengthy discussion which resulted in us talking to Russell Southwood, one of the authors of the book. In this episode we look at how the book came to get written, and what effects it had.